MCAS Cherry Point News

 

Photo Information

Col. Eric E. Austin congratulates Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron 14 Marines for reaching the Deputy Commandant of Aviation's goal of 155 available Harrier engines at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., Dec. 18, 2015. That number was determined by considering the number of Harriers still in the fleet along with the number of spares that are required around the world to keep the Harrier community in the air. Austin is the commanding officer for Marine Aircraft Group 14. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jason Jimenez/Released)

Photo by Cpl. Jason Jimenez

MALS-14: Harrier Engines ready for use

23 Dec 2015 | Cpl. Jason Jimenez 10th Marine Regiment

Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron 14 reached the Deputy Commandant of Aviation's goal of 155 Ready For Issue engines across the fleet for Harrier engine availability here, Dec. 18.

The Marine Aircraft Group 14 commanding officer, Col. Eric E. Austin, gathered the Marines of MALS-14 Power Plants Division to thank them for the hard work they provided to reach the goal.

 

“That number was determined by considering the number of Harriers still in the fleet along with the number of spares that are required around the world to keep the Harrier community healthy,” said 2nd Lt. Jennifer Caylor, the power plants officer for MALS-14. “Reaching the goal of 155 is huge, because it means we are positively contributing to the overall readiness of the Harrier program.”

 

MALS-14 is one of three repair facilities throughout the Marine Corps– the others being MALS-13 in Yuma, AZ and Fleet Readiness Center East right here at Cherry Point.

 

“Maintaining these engines poses many unique challenges due to parts constraints and the overall age of the engines themselves,” said Capt. Jake Lay, the assistant aircraft maintenance officer for MALS-14. “The Marines have overcome many material challenges and production obstacles through their ingenuity, planning and forethought.”

 

Through the process of cannibalization, Marines were able to attain usable parts from downed engines to replace damaged pieces of an engine that is currently in use.

 

Power Plants Marines became extremely proficient at cannibalization and identifying the most efficient ways to execute engine teardown to build an additional engine, explained Lay.

 

“It is absolutely incredible to witness the knowledge, expertise, ingenuity and drive these Marines have each day to achieve their mission,” said Lay. “The MALS-14 leadership is extremely proud to have such dedicated Marines.”

 

It was only a short time ago that there were aircraft with no engine assigned, because there were none available, explained Caylor.

 

“Today we don’t have that problem,” she said.


Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point