MCAS Cherry Point News

 

Photo Information

Lt. Col. Chris S. Richie salutes during the playing of the national anthem at the Marine Air Control Squadron 2 change of command ceremony at the squadron's parade field June 16. Richie relinquished command to Lt. Col. Darry W. Grossnickle.

Photo by Cpl. Alicia Leaders

New leader takes charge of MACS-2

24 Jun 2011 | Cpl. Alicia Leaders

Leadership is defined as a person who influences others to accomplish individual or group goals. In the Marine Corps, every Marine is a leader by trait, billet or personality. Marines are a direct reflection of their leadership, and the top leader for any squadron is its commanding officer.

 “A squadron takes on the personality of its commander, and you can walk into a squadron area and immediately see what kind of CO it has,” said Col. Peter J. Devine, the Marine Air Control Group 28 commanding officer. “If you walk into Marine Air Control Squadron 2, you will see motivated, hard charging, squared-away professionals who are ready to go to work. And that’s been the hallmark of Lt. Col. Chris Richie’s work.”

Lt. Col. Chris S. Richie relinquished his duties as the MACS-2 commanding officer to Lt. Col. Darry W. Grossnickle at the squadron parade field June 16.

“Lt. Col. Grossnickle has certainly achieved this milestone,” said Richie. “He wasn’t picked here by accident. He is a good leader, an effective communicator, and he is very intelligent. I know he is going to do wonderful things and take MACS-2 to levels that we can’t even imagine right now.”

During Richie’s command, his Marines have supported multiple operations in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Central and South America. He said his Marines’ energy and motivation has thrilled him each day while in command, pushing him to be a better commander.

“I am absolutely ecstatic to be the one to step into your shoes,” said Grossnickle. “They are big shoes to fill. I could’ve been assigned to any unit but to come in behind you to follow on in your legacy is a privilege.”

Richie served almost eight years with MACS-2, and he spent 18 months of that time commanding the squadron.

“If there were any type of legacy looked back upon, I hope I have instilled in these Marines that being a person of upright character is the most important aspect of who we are,” said Richie. “Character is the foundation of everything, and I talked to these Marines about it all the time, and MACS-2 Marines are men and women of character without a doubt.”


Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point