MCAS Cherry Point News

 

Photo Information

Cpl. Richard L. Smith, right, watches as a Marine throws a grenade out of a training pit during Battery B, 2nd Low Altitude Air Defense Battalion’s grenade training at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, June 8. More than 25 Marines conducted the training, throwing two blue body practice grenades for every one live grenade that was thrown. “This training helps my Marines when we deploy to Afghanistan,” said 1st Lt. Konrad N. Reese, platoon commander for 2nd Platoon, Battery B, 2nd LAAD Bn.

Photo by Pfc Cory D. Polom

Twist, pull pin: 2nd LAAD gunners grenade-train at Camp Lejeune

15 Jun 2011 | Pfc. Cory D. Polom

The current war fighting mission of the Marine Corps requires Marines to conduct combat operations in urban environments. This means Marines put their training to the test when they clear rooms, houses and buildings in a hostile environment while they are deployed to Afghanistan.

Marines with Battery B, 2nd Low Altitude Air Defense Battalion, traveled from Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point to Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune to increase their grenade skills June 8.

“This training helps my Marines when we deploy to Afghanistan,” said 1st Lt. Konrad N. Reese, platoon commander for 2nd Platoon, Battery B, 2nd LAAD Bn. “Knowing how to use a grenade is almost just as important as using your rifle during today’s deployments.”

Reese said the Marines would be using two dummy grenades called Blue Bodies and would throw one live grenade as well. “

The Marines will be doing a two-to-one ratio with this training,” said Reese. “It allows us to know they are ready when they go to throw the real thing.”

Pit noncommissioned officers watched over the Marines conducting training, directing orders and ensuring safety precautions were implemented in the grenade pits.

“This training can get really dangerous fast,” said Sgt. Cameron S. Neivert, a section leader with 2nd Platoon, Battery B, 2nd LAAD Bn. “The pit NCOs are there to help run down the check list of what needs to be done in the pit and if someone throws the grenade into the pit or drops it, they are there to save lives.”

Neivert said the pit NCO will tackle a thrower out of the pit if they are in danger from a grenade.

“These baseball-size helpers can be used against enemies and this training helps us learn how to take care of each other,” said Neivert.

After the Marines went through their training they went to the live fire range and began blowing holes in the grenade range.

“With the help of the pit NCOs and the intelligence of the Marines here, today went really smooth and without injury,” said Reese. “The pit NCOs were able to execute the training without flaw. During the practice portion of today we tested the pit’s knowledge by simulating a dropped grenade and they executed perfectly. The training and the leadership made this day go off without flaw and gave each Marine the confidence for the live throws.”


Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point