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Firefighter Raymond Bane, a driver-operator at Cherry Point Fire and Emergency Services (CPF&ES), and the recipient of the 2020 Firefighter of the Year Award, stands in front of a Fire Engine at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina, Feb. 25, 2021. Bane does a lot for both the fire station, and the community he serves. He organized the department’s training facility by repurposing office cubicles for a realistic training environment. He volunteers at local elementary schools to allow for uninterrupted teacher lunch hours and planning periods. He oversaw the wellness and nutrition classes for the department, creating customized programs for department members. He also built a playground at Brinson Elementary School for student use. (U.S. Marine Corps photo taken by Pfc. Michael Neuenhoff)

Photo by Pfc. Michael Neuenhoff

Firefighter of the Year Award

17 Mar 2021 | PFC. Michael Neuenhoff Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point

Hand-picked by his assistant chiefs and captains, Lt. Raymond Bane, a driver-operator with Cherry Point Fire and Emergency Services (CPF&ES), won the Firefighter of the Year Award for 2020. The selection was based off of Bane’s accomplishments, job performance, technical competence, leadership ability, attitude, initiative, and his resourcefulness with CPF&ES.
“… The Firefighter of the Year Award is the overall accumulation of performance, initiative, leadership, and going above and beyond,” said Bane. “But honestly winning this award was unexpected, I just come into work and try to put forth my best.”
Bane’s best goes above and beyond. He stepped up to take over different responsibilities within the fire department and assists in different programs to benefit the firefighters and the fire department as a whole. Bane steps up to the plate whenever he can to ensure the success and safety of those he works with, and those he’s sworn to protect.
“I took over the role of training here within the fire department,” said Bane. “I assist in the health and wellness program to get firefighters back in shape by writing meal plans and work out regiments for them and I’ve taken on some other projects that were outside my scope, so to speak.”
Bane was aware he was submitted for the award by his captain, and that his captain thought he was deserving of it, however he wasn’t expecting to win. Bane felt there were many other firefighters who were just as deserving, if not more than himself.
“I knew I was put up for it,” said Bane. “My captain told me he nominated me and thought I should receive the award.”
Bane does a lot for both the Fire Station, and the community he serves. He organized the department’s training facility, repurposing office cubicles for a realistic training environment, volunteers at local elementary schools to enable uninterrupted teacher lunch hours and planning periods, he oversaw the wellness and nutrition classes for the department creating customized programs for department members, and he built a playground at Brinson Elementary School for student use.
“Bane is a multifaceted firefighter,” said Captain Daniel Whitehead, a fire captain at CPF&ES. “He takes on many different extra duties, all while maintaining superior performance. He has effectively filled the rolls of driver-operator and as acting fire captain.”
Bane’s capability to take on any task really set him ahead of his peers for receiving this award. Being a senior firefighter, Bane has a lot of experience and skills when it comes to his profession. In the absence of his supervisor, Bane ensures firefighters on his shift complete the departments required tasks for maintaining readiness.
“He really excelled as the acting Captain,” said Whitehead. “He is a superior leader who demonstrates a dedicated commitment to improving the department while working countless hours outside of the normal working day.”
In addition to everything he does within CPF&ES and the community, Bane saves lives. For the third time, Bane received the Marine Corps Fire and Emergency Services Lifesaving Award for being a vital response member for an individual who was crushed by a cargo elevator.
“It feels nice to be appreciated,” said Bane, “but as far as me doing my job, I’m just going to keep doing things as usual. I take this role as a Firefighter extremely seriously. From here on out, things aren’t really going to change with me. Every day I come into work, I just bust my butt and do my best so, yes it feels nice to receive an award and be noticed for what I do but, I don’t do this for the awards. That just comes along with the job I guess. Hopefully, now that spotlight is on me a little more, I can set the example for some of these newer, younger firefighters, and hopefully I can show them hard work does pay off. It’s worth it.”


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Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point