MCAS Cherry Point News

 

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Anchoring points, key pieces of the recently built high power run up system, sit attached to the HPRU system on the flight line at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., May 2, 2017. Heavy equipment operators and expeditionary airfield Marines assigned to Marine Wing Support Squadron 274, Marine Aircraft Group 14, 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing worked to construct the system together. The HPRU system is used to test aircraft engines before flight by securing them to the ground on anchoring points and running the engine at full power to ensure they can operate at full capacity and complete the mission safely. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Mackenzie Gibson/Released)

Photo by Cpl. Mackenzie Gibson

Marines construct high power run up system for 2nd MAW aircraft

4 May 2017 | Cpl. Mackenzie Gibson 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing

The safety of Marines and equipment is paramount in any operational environment. A series of tests and pre-flight checks are conducted regularly by Marines to ensure optimal engine safety of all Marine Corps aircraft.

Heavy equipment operators and expeditionary airfield Marines assigned to Marine Wing Support Squadron 274, Marine Aircraft Group 14, 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing worked together to construct a high power run up system at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina, March 27-April 27, 2017.

“Our main purpose is to ensure that the flight line is operational in order to get aircraft safely into the sky,” said Staff Sgt. Michael Scott, the operations chief assigned to MWSS-274. “With any type of big project like this, the Marines can see it start from nothing and watch it grow into something important. Once the Marines see the finished product, it gives them a sense of accomplishment.”

The project was conducted by 25 Marines overall and required a total of 2,000 work hours to complete. The HPRU system is used to test aircraft engines before flight by securing them to the ground on anchoring points and running the engine at full power to ensure they can operate at full capacity. Pfc. Ian Andrek, an expeditionary airfield systems technician with MWSS-274, states the building of the system was a hands-on project that the unit rarely gets to experience.


“It provides the ability to perform a live test on the engines without having to go in the air,” said Andrek. “It’s cool because we can set up the system anywhere and it gives the aviation units that deploy the ability to do what they do here at home, anywhere around the world.  

The system is slated to be fully operational within the next few weeks. The completion of the project will continue to ensure the training missions of squadrons aboard MCAS Cherry Point are accomplished safely and effectively.


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