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Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point

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Cherry Point, North Carolina
Marines take a day to learn about safety

By Pfc. Victor A. Arriaga | Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point | May 30, 2013

MARINE CORPS AIR STATION CHERRY POINT, N.C. --

Marines with Marine Air Control Squadron 2 gathered for the 2013 spring operational pause May 23 at the MACS-2 headquarters building.

The unit’s operational pause took a new approach to training. Stations were set up with different scenarios about summer dangers. Marines actively participated at each station and received a more hands-on approach about making the right decisions over summer.

“We have never done anything like this before,” said Gunnery Sgt. Jason Forguson, the training chief for MACS-2. “We were hoping to let the Marines get more involved with their training. Everyone seemed to be more receptive to it. I think they learned a lot this way.”

The scenarios covered alcohol awareness, texting and driving, boating safety, seatbelt safety and fire hazards.

Marines were allowed to try on beer goggles which simulated the effects drinking has on your vision and were allowed to view a station that simulated a car crash where the victim was not wearing a seatbelt.

Petty Officer 2nd class James Martinez, a boatswain’s mate with Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron, was in charge of the boating safety station.

“It’s summer, people go boating,” said Martinez. “I went over some boating safety and regulations that are easily forgotten to keep people on and off shore safe this summer.”

Fire and police department as well as civilian subject matter experts were also on hand to help teach the Marines about safety.

Fire department personnel taught heat casualty and fire safety classes while the police department gave a distracted driving class, which taught Marines about the dangers of texting, and driving.

The training was also a way to bring the Marines together to talk about teamwork and decision making in all potentially dangerous situations.

 “We wanted to make sure the Marines were prepared and were aware of the dangers that are out there,” said Beckie Kerkenides, a family readiness officer with MACS-2. “Even if they see someone who may not be making the right call, they can stand up and help out their brother or sister because we are a family.”



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